Daiso Japan – Hanafuda – Flower Cards

Daiso Japan – Hanafuda – Flower Cards

Hanafuda, or Flower Cards, are Japanese playing cards that were originated as ‘tenshou karuta’, which were influenced by the western playing cards around the end of the Muromachi period (approximately 1336 to 1573). It is said that the current Hanafuda were created around mid Edo period (1603 ~ 1868).
The Hanfuda deck from Daiso Japan contains 48 Flower cards (35mm (W) x 52mm (H), 1mm thick) and 6 blank spare cards. The cards comes with a plastic case with a clear top for storage. Also included is a sheet that covers the rules and the scoring of the cards.
The Hanafuda deck of 48 cards is divided into 12 suits, one for each month.
The objective of the game is to score more points than the other player(s) by matching special combinations of cards based on their flower, or month. Using the same 48 cards, there are different sets of rules that can be played.

Trivia:The famous video game maker Nintendo started it’s life manufacturing Hanafuda cards.
http://nintendo.wikia.com/wiki/Nintendo

How to play

I’m not even going to try as there are sites that explain the rules much better than I can.
Games Played with Flower Cards
Wikipedia

Caution:
– Do not throw the cards at face or body, as it may cause injuries.
– Do not bend the cards, drop the case or use force when handling the cards, as they may cause injuries.
– Store cards in case after use to avoid losing the cards.
– Keep away from direct sunlight or high temperatures.
– Keep out of reach of children.

Product details

Product name: Flower Cards (ケース付 花札 – ke-su tsuki hanafuda)
Sold in 100 yen shop Daiso Japan
Product code: 4947678635263
Materials: Case – PP; Cards – PVC
Size: 35mm (W) x 52mm (H), 1mm thick for each card
Made in Korea
Price: 100 yen + tax

Derek’s review

This set of Hanafuda cards is very well made considering they are 100 yen for the set. The illustrated side has a smooth finish and the back of the card has with texturing. I noticed that the illustrated side has some slight scratches and blotches that can be seen when the light reflects off it.
I’ve been meaning to learn how to play Hanafuda ever since I learned that Nintendo started their business making, and is still making them. Maybe one day I will… maybe on a rainy day when there’s nothing on the telly.
If you’re not in Japan, you can try Amazon for the Daiso Flower Cards

Derek's Rating
Our Reader Score
[Total: 4 Average: 2.3]

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